Grizedale Arts

Farmyard Radio

Spend a happy hour each Friday before you hit the weekend. Listen online to whoever is in our office talking all things Grizedale. Regular topics will include Dr Dolittle talks to the Artists, The Curing of Pork, Strange but Local, In Today's Trug, Cultural Collision of the Week, What a Difference a Day Makes and many more.

Monday 24 March '14
(from Farmyard Radio)

The Office of Useful Art

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Alistair in the Office

Alistair Hudson talking with Chto Delat and MA Fine Art Students from Liverpool John Moores University

On the 8th of November Grizedale’s ‘Office of Useuful Art’ (or OUA) opened at Tate Liverpool as part of the show ‘Art Turning Left: How Values Changed Making 1789–2013’. This was the first of several on-going manifestations that the OUA will have over the next few years. As Alistair describes “The Office is part classroom part propaganda machine for the idea of Useful Art, recruiting for the Useful Art Association and working in parallel to the Museum of Arte Util at the Van Abbemuseum Eindhoven where we will also be press ganging people into Useology from December 7th”. As such, the OUA at Tate Liverpool provided a complex, multi-purpose space in which ideas could be discussed and plans for futures could begin to be hatched and materialized. As well as providing an open drop-in space for visitors to the ‘Art Turning Left Show’, the OUA also provided a bookable space for anybody to hold discussions, talks, interventions or re-thinks about the show and/or the possible use of art.

The OUA at Tate Liverpool also provided a very successful model for integrating students within the infrastructure of a live show. Around 25 undergraduate BA (Hons) Fine Art students from my University (Liverpool John Moores) signed up to work in the office and to recruit exhibition visitors to the Useful Art Association. Also, a group of my MA Fine Art students have become very interested in how the OUA attempts to work and rethink the conventional gallery/museum space as a site for information, intervention and exchange.

We also used the OUA as a location for a first meeting of the L’Internationale Mediation group who will be develop a series of seminars, interventions, discussions, publications and collaborations with us over the course of the ‘Uses of Art’ project (which will run for the next 5 years). The OUA itself, as an ongoing, developing, changing, mutating phenomena will also act as one of the key examples of how we can begin to rethink the role and relationship between art, education and use.

Although we are only beginning to look back at the impact, successes and pitfalls of the OUA’s first manifestation (as it will soon be travelling to different locations, in different guises, and working in different ways) it has already acted as a real means to think through complex and overlapping issues surrounding the production, distribution and reception of art. Rather than acting as a simple ‘information point’ – by which visitors to the exhibition could re-affirm their experience of the show by accessing the official ‘rationale’ or have the show ‘explained to them’ in ‘layman’s terms’ – the first iteration of the OUA has acted as a real space in which ideas of education and the production of meaning began to happen within a traditional galley space. As different people, from a wide variety of backgrounds, began to use and re-use the propositions found in Art Turning Left both the show, and the Office of Useful Art, began to act as a toolkit for producing new meanings. As Steven Wright argues in his recent book ‘Towards a Lexicon of Usership’ (which can be downloaded at the online Museum Of Arte Útil) we, passive spectatorship is currently being replaced by active usership. This, in turn, enables a more radical re-think of how institutions can begin to re-think or re-invent themselves as civic institutions for the production of knowledge.

The link between the OUA at Tate Liverpool and the simultaneous presence of Grizedale Arts at Van Abbemuseum’s ‘Museum of Useful Art’ show is crucial here. This has also begun to offer ways of thinking through different kinds of simultaneous usership, in different locations, and across different timescales – offering a way of beginning to think of alternative and overlapping temporalities (of uses and re-uses of histories and imagined futures, as well as contemporary materials that are ready to hand, which overlap and replay themselves as non-linear possibility). This also offers an opportunity for us to re-purpose and to revivify the role and function of the art institution (be it museum, gallery, education or production based) as a collaborative maker of histories and futures, one that relies on its users to help produce and reproduces an active civic role.


Tuesday 5 July '11
(from Farmyard Radio)

Can Art be Useful?

During the recent ‘Terminal Convention’ Symposium in Cork, our erstwhile Ruskinite-Reformer and keen Big J R blogger Alistair Hudson began his own presentation by showing David Shrigley’s animation ‘An Important Message About the Arts’. Intended as a useful propaganda tool for yet another UK institution threatened by massive government cuts – in this case the Arts Council UK – Shrigley’s animation used the characters of a farmer and his son to make a case for Art’s economic viability (as a key driver in both the Creative and Tourism/Leisure Industries) and, perhaps more predictably, for Art’s assumed cultural and civilising values. As Alistair pointed out though, the twin towers of economy and truth tend to overlook the question of art’s use-value.

In the light of this, Alistair went on to pose a series of key questions which tend to loosely underpin the Grizedale way - what kind of thing would artist’s do if they decided to make themselves useful? What can artists begin to do as citizens? What would art look like if it wasn’t reduced to monetary imperatives on one hand or the need to ‘inform’ the masses from the dizzying heights of culture on the other? What would happen if artists didn’t necessarily commit to producing luxury consumer goods for London centric art market? In other words, what happens if we began to re-look at the possible use-value of art?

As it turns out, these are also questions that big J R had begun to ask in the latter part of his career – the bit where he moved to asking questions about the morality of aesthetics (and also the bit where people began to think he was barking mad started to ignore him). It seems these questions also drove some of big J R’s thinking behind his support for Mechanics Institutes: as educational centers for the working class, as places where art, science, theatre and music would all combine to provide a rounded education.

These questions of art’s use value, and the role they can play in education, are perhaps more pertinent today than they were in Ruskin’s time. As Universities are now asking students to take up 9K loans per year to cover their Higher Education fees, and as the UK government is proposing ‘employability’ league tables for every HE course in the country (to help prospective students and their parents chose the courses of study most likely to get them a job), it’s maybe time to give this all a little more thought? Being involved in Higher Education myself (running the both the Fine Art and History of Art Degree Programmes at Liverpool School of Art and Design – part of Liverpool John Moores University which, incidentally, can trace its roots back to an Arts and Mechanics Institute that was set up in Liverpool in 1823) I’m really interested in continuing a critical Ruskinian re-invention by beginning to pose two key post-Ruskinian questions myself – Just what kind of job is to be done by artists in today’s increasingly instrumentalised and economically driven society? And, in the light of this, what kind of work does making art become?

So, over the next months I’m proposing to ask these questions, Flip camera in hand, of anybody who is willing to attempt an answer (admittedly this may not be many). I’ll also try to link this to some of the goings on down Coniston Institute way and, of course, attempt to seek some help and guidance from the legacy of Big J R as I go. I also have a feeling that cheese, vegetables and soup may figure prominently in this analysis.


Friday 28 November '08
(from Farmyard Radio)

Guestroom library proposal - CANCELLED due to unforeseen circumstances

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somthing like this

Guestroom present their proposals for the Lawson Park and Coniston libraries - live. This really is them presenting their plans and ideas so may not be very radio orientated, more of a fly on the wall broadcast. 

Sad to say this weeks broadcast has been cancelled, could say it was due to heavy snow, but sadly rather more mundane reasons keep us from you - the train is late. 

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Wednesday 19 November '08
(from Farmyard Radio)

Peter Hodgson in the Yard - 21st November

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Village Kiosk films featuring Peter Hodgson

Farmyard radio is delighted to be welcoming Peter Hodgson talking about his life and works. Peter is a leather worker and artist based in Ambleside, his work has been the cornerstone of the Honesty stall and is currently represented at the myvillages village kiosk at the GSK season at the Royal Academy   

http://www.hidehornambleside.co.uk

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Friday 14 November '08
(from Farmyard Radio)

Madam Alone

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It's my shack

Adam on his own in the office, in a week of increasing building problems. It promises a lengthy blues moan over a disco soundtrack about buildings - actually that sounds fine

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Friday 7 November '08
(from Farmyard Radio)

Back to bark

The usual team back in the yard for a change, plenty to talk about even if most of it is off record so to speak, just between the 2 of us - web radio - where that can really be true.

Appropro (spelling debate in the office) of nothing, well i ve just been looking at it, check this blog for farmyard chic http://greenhousevt.blogspot.com


Friday 3 October '08
(from Farmyard Radio)

Dans le cour de la ferme

Farmyard radio goes French with a visit from La Drome and a group redeveloping a 1930's utopian community in the France profond.


Friday 5 September '08
(from Farmyard Radio)

Back from summer

Alistair and Adam reminisce about the 'summer' including Alistair's adventures at Creamfields....

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Friday 29 August '08
(from Farmyard Radio)

Summer break apologies

We'll be back in the yard next week Friday 5th September, welcoming autumn....


Thursday 19 June '08
(from Farmyard Radio)

The rains came

Friday 20th June in the Yard, visits from artists Nina Pope, Stuart Bastik of Artgene, discussion likely to cover 'Song For a Circus' and Stuart's shack project in Barrow.

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